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Posts Tagged ‘Fashion’

2013 Portland Fashion Week

  Image via Flickr       Portland Fashion Week will take place Sept 25-29, 2013.  Designers are selected by a panel of fashion experts, buyers, editors, and producers who then chose the best to showcase on the Runway.  2013 Schedule Announced | Portland Fashion Week® portlandfashionweek.net1/18/13 2013 Schedule Announced. We are excited to announce our 2013 schedule for the Spring shows. Be sure to save the date! Portland Fashion Week 2013 will be held Sept 25-29 in the luxurious downtown area in the heart of Portland Oregon. This 5 day show will honor Mother Earth.  From the new bamboo runway to the onsite solar power, the showcase will have many unique features.

Ready for Spring and Change?

  Image via Flickr Each day I read numerous blogs and articles in an effort to bring good information to Fabrics.net on a variety of subjects.  This morning my thoughts turned to Spring Fashions after reading the Burda newsletter so I started looking for good information on this topic.  The blog I found is one of the best I have seen for a while.  The CupcakeCartel has gathered a huge amount of information and photos!  The CupcakeCartel: SPRING 2013 FASHION TRENDS thecupcakecartel.blogspot.com2/8/13 Here is a sneak peek at Spring 2013 Fashion Trends! We can look forward to 90’s throwbacks, Japanese-inspired pieces, stripes, ruffles, sheer fabrics, black & white, harnesses, crop tops, LOTS of color and my favs military, …   Home trends for 2013 are DIY and economical both in money and time.  2013’s hottest home trends and easy upgrades … – The Global Digital www.theglobaldigital.com2/8/13 (BPT) – The top home decor trends for 2013 are already emerging, and homeowners seeking a fresh look will find a lot to love. Not only can these looks be accomplished in minimal time – they’re budget friendly and easy …   More great information and wonderful pictures from a blog with a fun name, Potlucks on the Porch.  Now who couldn’t love having a potluck on the porch?  Potlucks on the Porch: 2013 Home Trends www.potlucksontheporch.com1/29/13 If you are looking for an update to your home or just want to freshen things up a little, here are a few home trends that you will be seeing this year. I found this great article from azcentral.com that had some great advice: …   Enjoy!        

What is Supima Cotton

After blogging yesterday about facts to consider when buying sheets, I found more information to add. Pima cotton is the generic name for extra-long staple cotton that is grown in the US, Australia, Peru and a few other countries. A finer cotton fiber, the length of pima cotton is 1 3/8 inches or longer. Supima cotton is a trademark name used to promote and market the American Pima cotton. Egyptian cotton is cotton grown in egypt but not all fabrics and items termed Egyptian cotton is 100% extra-long staple cotton. Thus sheets labeled 100% Egyptian cotton are basically cotton from Egypt but the cotton could be shorter fiber cotton grown in Egypt and long staple cotton grown in Egypt. Supima Cotton is 100% Pima cotton. Supima Cotton – US Grown Pima | Fashion Group International …   fgiseattle.org8/29/11 Be sure to come to our event this week, 9/1 @ 4 pm. Supima: A Century of Cultivating Cotton By ARTHUR FRIEDMAN While its lineage is as fuzzy as a ball of cotton, the mission of Supima is clear — to promote, improve and …   If anyone has had garments from Pima cotton, you might have questioned whether or not the garment was 100% cotton it was so soft and resists wrinkling, pilling and fading. You may have also noticed that there was less lint in your dryer screen. The story of Pima Cotton by Brooks Brothers Clothing adds more interesting information. Supima Cotton can be found in many garments for men, women, children and babies.  Sheets and towels also come in Supima Cotton.  Enjoy!

What is Chine`?

    For Christmas I received a book entitled ‘Fashion: The Collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute; A History from the 18th to the 20th Century.’      As I have been reading through it, there have been a few terms that I had never heard of before. One of which is the word and definition of Chine` not to be confused with Chintz, or Chine` a` la Branche in French which refers to the process by which it is dyed. Groups or bundles “branches” of the warp threads are printed on before the threads are woven together. The end result is that of a watermark looking print, as if water was allowed to weep the dye up and down the fabric. Another characteristic of this print is that it is dominated by floral patterns where as the Japanese Hogushi-weaving, a type of Kasuri and Ikat (which I have heard of and is of India origins), is more likely to be of a geometric pattern. Also the Chine` patterns were mainly produced in pastel colors on a very fine silk taffeta material.      In its early production Europe had a difficult time making it so the fabric only came from French fabric houses, mainly Lyons and by early production I am talking late seventeen hundreds. To give you an idea of where in history this fabric came into vogue; Madame de Pompadour, one of fashion history’s most influential floozy’s, otherwise known as the mistress of King Louis the XV, made the fabric very popular because of her preference for it there by giving it the nick name Pompadour taffeta. Marie-Antoinette carried on the tradition of wearing the material. A Funny little fact is that Madame Pompadour’s full name was Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, Or The Marquise de Pompadour.      Don’t you just love fashion History? A little note here, I have read and am still reading many terms and some are not all cohesive so if there is anyone who is an expert and runs across any information pertaining to these terms that does not jell with what I have found, please, please forward me anything and everything they know or have found. I will do my best to check into these and correct any misinformation of mine. There is just so much out there it is hard to get to some of the origins of things. Love the journey though.

Fall Fashion Shows Canceled

I am sorry to break this news but due to situations outside of my control the fall fashion shows that I have been planning are canceled indefinitely.  I will still be developing my brand and making clothing in preparation for next years Portland Fashion week and hopefully some day NY Fashion week.  If you would like to check out the portfolio of the styles that I am developing please go to www.KirstenLonglyDesigns.com   You can click on the pictures on the main page to read blogs and postings as well as clicking on the word Portfolio in order to see the line in progress.  Halloween is coming up as well and I am taking orders for costumes.  Thank you all for your support and I hope you enjoy what you see. Sincerely Kirsten Longly

Polyester Voile Table Cloth

Polyester Voile Table Cloth   Taping embroidery voile table cloth Material: 100% Polyester Voile Fabric Pattern: Embroidered Shape: Rectangle Feature: Waterproof Use: Home, Hotel, Wedding, Party, Banquet     Fashion Voile Table Cloth Material: 100% Polyester Voile Fabric Pattern:   Embroidered Technic:  Knitted Shape:      Round Feature:  Waterproof Use:           Home, Hotel, Wedding, Party, Banquet       Voile Curtains – Translucence Elegance doorcurtains.org … voile to make some varieties of curtains. Many voile curtains are made from pure cotton voile or combination of cotton and polyester blend. It doesn’t matter what kind of voile is utilized for curtains, clothing or table cloths, it will drape well. Fabrics Blog: Dress Windows with Voile Fabric fabricsnet.blogspot.com How to design your windows with voile fabric. Measure your windows, and decide on the length of window dressing you want. When deciding on the length, you can opt to choose the length that ends just below the frame.  

Wooly, wooly.

So years ago I entered a contest with a wool jacket that I had felted myself on my Bernina machine with the needle punch unit. It was really the first time I had ever felted anything, but not the first time I had worked with wool. I love working with wool but I have a problem with it. I am allergic to it. I spent hours felting and more hours itching and sneezing, but I’m nothing if not a glutton for punishment. A really good wool is a pleasure to work with in that it is so easily manipulated. A quality wool sews together like butter. Curves melt into each other and seams mold to each other when steam is applied. This year I got the chance to work with a Wool Melton. I have to say it is probably the most wonderful wool I have ever worked with. Not only did it do everything I wanted it too but I was not effected allergy wise like I usually am when I work with wool. I was in heaven.  Check out all our wool melton selections at Fabrics.net